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Call for Submissions Split This Rock Poem of the Week

Call for Submissions
Split This Rock Poem of the Week

Open to Split This Rock Festival Attendees & Presenters

Submit by June 19, 2016
We are now accepting submissions for
Split This Rock’s Poem of the Week Series
that publishes a contemporary poem online each week.

Submit up to 3 poems via Submittable by June 19, 2016.

Who Can Submit: This call is only open to poets who attended and/or presented at Split This Rock Poetry Festival: Poems of Provocation & Witness 2016 AND who do not yet appear in The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database — the anthology of poems of provocation and witness at Split This Rock’s website.
 
We are especially interested in 
themes currently under-represented in The Quarry, poems on themes such as (but not limited to) Indigenous life and resistance, disability issues, working class issues, poverty and inequality, international perspectives, transgender and genderqueer themes.
We’re also looking for socially engaged poems of provocation and witness, poems on topics such as (but not limited to) identity, community, civic engagement, politics, economics, government, war, leadership, education, activism, history, Americana, and cultural icons.

Read the full list of guidelines at Split This Rock’s website or Submittable page.

Accessibility: If Submittable is not accessible to you, please contact us at info@splitthisrock.org for instructions on how to e-mail your submission. It is important that we know about your situation before receiving your mailed or emailed entry. Please allow sufficient time for your submission to be received.

From The Quarry & Split This Rock

Poem of the Week

    Teri Ellen Cross Davis     

 
Drought

        — based on a New York Times photograph of a grieving mother during Sudan’s 2005 drought

 

When you were inside me I could feel you thrive
your rounded kicks, my body your taut drum.
Now I beat these breasts, betrayed by a landscape
that wilts, a place where even tears won’t come.
Your rounded kicks in my body’s taut drum
why push, gush blood, why make you,
to wilt in a place where even tears don’t come?
No milk on your lips, your wavering cry
why push, gush blood, why make you?
How do my feet keep going, weighted by
your wavering cry still no milk for your lips,
and you grow lighter day after day?
How do my feet keep going, the weight of
when you were inside me, thrives, when I felt you.
Now you have grown lighter-and day after day
I beat these breasts, blamed, betrayed by this landscape.

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Used with permission. Photo by Mignonette Dooley.

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Teri Ellen Cross Davis is a Cave Canem fellow and has attended the Soul Mountain Writer’s Retreat, the Virginia Center for Creative Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. Her work can be read in: Bum Rush The Page: A Def Poetry JamGathering Ground: A Reader Celebrating Cave Canem’s First Decade, Full Moon on K Street: Poems About Washington, DC; and the following journals: Beltway Poetry QuarterlyGargoyleNatural BridgeTorchPoet Lore and The North American Review. Her first collectionHaint is newly released this month by Gival Press. She lives in Silver Spring, MD.
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Please feel free to share Split This Rock Poem of the Week widely. We just ask you to include all of the information in this post, including this request. Thanks!
To read more poems of provocation and witness, please visit The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at SplitThisRock.org.
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Split This Rock :: 20 Nov 15

Poem of the Week

E. Ethelbert Miller

Are you listening?

If I was tree green instead of black
they would come and cut my branches,
destroy my roots, transport my
life and turn me into paper pulp.
Everything would be lost to history
like disappearing forests and burning woods.
Yes, they would cut me down with a sharp
axe and say I fell on my own and would
you my dear, hear my sound?
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Used with permission.

 
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E. Ethelbert Miller is a literary activist and the board chair of the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS). The Collected Poems  of  E. Ethelbert Miller edited by Kirsten Porter will be released by Willow Books in March 2016. To learn more visit Ethelbert’s website.
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Please feel free to share Split This Rock Poem of the Week widely. We just ask you to include all of the information in this post, including this request. Thanks!
To read more poems of provocation and witness, please visit The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at SplitThisRock.org.
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Split This Rock Poem of the Week :: Nov. 16

Poem of the Week

Tanya Olson

Photo of Tanya Olson sipping coffee
what else

What else should I want. But to
be a boy. A boy. At his mother’s hip.
A boy between. His father
and the plow. A boy to remain.
What else.

When a boy. I ran fevers.
In these fevers. I ran circles.
Pursued. Front stairs up.
Back stairs down.  No bright
lines. Only constant threshold.
How as a boy did I know. Some houses
had one stairs for family. One stairs
for help. During fevers
I knew not. If I was sick.
Or a betrayer of the other worlds.

As a boy. I thought picking up
the gun would make me. No longer
a boy. As a boy with a gun. I thought
being elsewhere. Made me
a different boy. As a boy with a gun
and a different tongue. I thought
returning home. Would bring me home.

What else did I. But run. What else
should I dream. But of home.
And home and home. What else to want.
But to be a boy and a boy and a boy.
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From Boyishly (YesYes Books, 2013). Used with permission. Photo by Ruth Eckles.

 
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Tanya Olson lives in Silver Spring, Maryland and is a Lecturer in English at University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC). Her first book, Boyishly, was published by YesYes Books in 2013 and was awarded a 2014 American Book Award. She has also won the Discovery/Boston Review prize and was named a Lambda Emerging Writers Fellow by the Lambda Literary Foundation. Her poem 54 Prince was included in Best American Poetry 2015.
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Please feel free to share Split This Rock Poem of the Week widely. We just ask you to include all of the information in this post, including this request. Thanks!
To read more poems of provocation and witness, please visit The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at SplitThisRock.org.
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We strive to preserve the text formatting of poems over e-mail, but certain e-mail programs may distort how characters, fonts, indents, and line wraps appear.
If you have difficulty reading this poem, please visit the poem at our site.

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Split This Rock :: Poem of the Week

Jennifer Bartlett

to walk means to fall
to thrust forward

to fall and catch

the seemingly random
is its own system of gestures

based on a series of neat errors
falling and catching

to thrust forward

sometimes the body misses
then collapses

sometimes
it shatters

with this particular knowledge

a movement spastic
and unwieldy

is its own lyric and
the able-bodied are

tone-deaf to this singing some

falling

is of its own grace

some

falling

                         rather occurs

out of laziness or distraction

here, the entire frame is shaken

these are the falls

where I tell myself

you shouldn’t have fallen

I mean to inflict

while the critic of the world watches

o stupid, stupid world

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This poem is an excerpt from Autobiography/Anti-Autobiography (Theenk, 2014). Used with permission.
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Jennifer Bartlett was born in the San Francisco Bay Area and educated at the University of New Mexico, Vermont College, and Brooklyn College. Bartlett is the author of Derivative of the Moving Image (UNM Press, 2007), (a) lullaby without any music (Chax, 2012), and Autobiography/Anti-Autobiography (Theenk, 2014). Bartlett also co-edited, with Sheila Black and Michael Northen, Beauty is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability. In December 2014, she co-edited, with Professor George Hart, a collection of the poet Larry Eigner’s letters and participated in a “roundtable” on disability and poetics for Poetry Magazine. Bartlett has received fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, Fund for Poetry, and the Dodd Research Center at the University of Connecticut. She is currently writing a full-length biography on Eigner, and recently had a residency at the Gloucester Writer’s Center. Bartlett has taught poetry and disability awareness at Willie Mae Rock Camp for Girls, United Cerebral Palsy, the MS Society, and New York Public Schools. Bartlett has had mild cerebral palsy since birth.

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If you have difficulty reading this poem, please visit the poem at our site.
Please feel free to share Split This Rock Poem of the Week widely. We just ask you to include all of the information in this post, including this request. Thanks!  To read more poems of provocation and witness, please visit The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at SplitThisRock.org.
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Split This Rock Nominations for Best of the Net!

Nominations! Poems! From Split This Rock!

I know it’s like all I post right now is Split This Rock stuff. Deal. It’s all so good!  [Promise though, I am working on an essay about the need or not for a the old works, for which am re-reading Paradise Lost, so hang on, homework first!!]

Meanwhile, yes, Best of the Net is an award from Sundress Publications many of Split This Rock‘s family of socially conscious poets totally deserve, but we can only nominate the poems we scoop. So, here, get your gaze on this list!!

NOMINATIONS

~ “Elegy,” by Rachel Eliza Griffiths
~”Paddling the Nickel Tailings Near Sudbury,” by Aaron Kreuter
~”not an elegy for Mike Brown,” by Danez Smith
~”A Small Needful Fact,” by Ross Gay
~”Set the Garden on Fire,” by Chen Chen
~”Of Late, I Have Been Thinking About Despair,” by TJ Jarrett

Visit these poems at The Quarry: A Social Justice Poetry Database at our website and peep the excellence.